• 29th July
    2014
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  • 29th July
    2014
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  • 29th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
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come-along-kitten-pond:

jingle-jangle-motherfucker:

thatkenziegirl:

Imagine walking along in the middle of a crowded city, with your headphones on. You glance down to change the music and when you look back up you see him walking right towards you. When he passes you he grabs your upper arm, turning you so that you’re walking along side him.
"Hello. Just keep walking, don’t look alarmed. I’m the Doctor, and I need your help."

Screaming.

TAKE ME NOW.

come-along-kitten-pond:

jingle-jangle-motherfucker:

thatkenziegirl:

Imagine walking along in the middle of a crowded city, with your headphones on. You glance down to change the music and when you look back up you see him walking right towards you. When he passes you he grabs your upper arm, turning you so that you’re walking along side him.

"Hello. Just keep walking, don’t look alarmed. I’m the Doctor, and I need your help."

Screaming.

TAKE ME NOW.

(Source: rosetylear, via whyonlydream)

  • 28th July
    2014
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  • 28th July
    2014
  • 28

And here, the biggest lesson of them all, and a summation of all the problems.

You are in the way of your story.

Hard truth: writing is actually not that important.

Writing is a mechanism.

It’s an inelegant middleman to what we do. It’s a shame, in some ways, that we even call ourselves writers, because it describes only the mechanical act of what we do. It’s a vital mechanism, sure, but by describing it as the prominent thing, it tends to suggest, well, prominence.

But our writing must serve story.

Story does not serve writing.

This is cart-before-horse stuff, but important to realize.

Listen, in what we do there exist three essential participants.

We have:

The tale, the teller of the tale, and the listener of the tale.

Story. Author. And audience.

That’s it.

You are two-thirds of that equation. You are the story (or, by proxy, its architect) and the teller of the story. The telling of the story is most often done through writing — through that mechanical act, and because it’s the act you can sit and watch, it’s the one that is used to describe our role. I AM WRITER, you say, and so you focus so much on the actual writing you forget that there’s this other invisible — but altogether more critical — part, which is what you’re writing.

So, what happens is, early on, you put so much on the page. You write and write and write and use too many words and too much exposition and big meaty paragraphs and at the end all it serves to do is create distance between the tale and the listener of the tale.

It keeps the audience at arm’s length.

Quit that shit.

Bring the audience into the story. This is at the heart of show, don’t tell — which is a rule that can and should be broken at times, but at its core remains a reasonable notion: don’t talk at, don’t preach, don’t lecture, don’t fill their time with unnecessary wordsmithy.

Get. To. The. Point.